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Neutral Density

Our range of Neutral Density Graduated Filters are used to balance the exposure within a scene – typically between the bright sky and considerably darker land. Full range of ND Standards also available.

Watch the ND Grads Video

Inspiring Professionals

Neutral Density Grads

Handmade – really handmade!

Our ND Grads may well be the most labour intensive item in many camera bags. Our skilled UK team gradually builds up the ND and gradation by dipping optically correct resin in and out of baths of dye and continuously monitoring the results. Each filter represents up to an hour of skilled work.

Compatible with both digital and film photography

Whatever format you shoot, ND Grads help cameras record scenes more like we see them – with a broad tonal range that's lost if not captured in the moment.

Precise creative control

There is a place in landscape photography for both hard and soft grads. Which one you decide to use will depend mainly on the subject matter of your image.

As a general rule, a hard grad would be used for images containing a horizon, or any hard transition between the sky and the foreground - even with jagged or mountainous horizons, the exposure can be controlled far easier with a hard grad.

Soft grads perform best in woodland, mist, or interiors. Anywhere where there is no definite transition between sky and foreground, a soft grad will gently balance exposure across the image.

Ultimate flexibility

ND Grads can be stacked together, or with other filters, so you can respond to almost any lighting situation.

A Practical Guide to ND Grads with Joe Cornish

A Practical Guide to ND Grads with Joe Cornish

In this video landscape photographer Joe Cornish explains why he uses ND Grads and how they work in practice. He shows how to select the right ND Grad for the dynamic range in your scene and gives a variety of technical and creative advice.

Xposure - Click to read our new online magazine

Xposure Issue 01

  • Influential photographer Colin Prior in the isolated and epic landscape of the Karakoram.
  • Craig Roberts goes urban and gets inspired.
  • Anatomy of a Landscape - three top photographers take apart their shots.
  • Composition Masterclass with Jonathan Chritchley.
  • And plenty more to whet your photographic appetite.

PDF downloadDownload PDF (37MB)

Durdle Door
Jeremy Walker
Durdle Door,
Dorset, England

Metering

Basic metering

Basic Metering (through the lens)

This can give very acceptable results with a high rate of success.
  1. Establish your foreground base exposure

    Set camera to manual. Point lens at foreground and take average centre weighted meter reading through the lens.

  2. Take a sky reading

    Note the exposure difference between ground and sky.

  3. Select a ND Grad

    Select the right ND grad to correct exposure difference to within 1 stop. For example, if the sky is 3 stops brighter than the ground, add a 0.6 ND (2 stop) grad filter to the sky only.

  4. Slide the filter into position

    The grad transition line should be visible through the viewfinder or on the LCD screen. Stopping the lens down and using the depth of field preview can make the grad transition line easier to see.

  5. Shoot

    Expose image using base exposure already established.

Advanced metering

Advanced Metering (hand-held spot meter)

A hand-held light meter gives more control and enables changing light to be monitored without repositioning the camera. The essence of this approach is: expose for the mid tones, allow for the shadows, filter the highlights.
  1. Establish your Base Exposure from mid-tones

    Lock camera in place on tripod. Take readings from scene mid-tones.

  2. Allow for shadows

    For detail to be retained in shadows they should be within 2 stops of base exposure. If necessary increase base exposure slightly.

  3. Take a reading from bright part of sky (not the sun)

    Note the exposure difference between ground and sky.

  4. Select a ND Grad

    Select the right ND grad to correct exposure difference to within 1.5 stops. Anything more than +2 stops will be burnt out in final image.

  5. Slide the filter into position

    The grad transition line should be visible through the viewfinder or on the LCD screen. Stopping the lens down and using the depth of field preview can make the grad transition line easier to see.

  6. Shoot

    Expose image using base exposure already established.

Before

Before LEE ND Grad

After – LEE 0.9 ND Grad Hard

After LEE ND Grad

Viewpoint

We regularly invite leading landscape photographers to share their inspiration, advice and technique in our press adverts.

Here we've gathered together some of the most interesting examples.

Click the preview to view full screen.

You might also be interested
in our hardback books:
Inspiring Professionals Inspiring Professionals 2

Inspiring Professionals

Viewpoint

We regularly invite leading landscape photographers to share their inspiration, advice and technique in our press adverts.

Here we've gathered together some of the most interesting examples.

Click here to take a look.

You might also be interested
in our hardback book:
Inspiring Professionals

Inspiring Professionals

Quick Start Videos

Get up to speed fast with our videos that explain the LEE Filter System and how to use it

Workshops

Inspirational courses with leading landscape photographer Jeremy Walker

Product Directory

Complete product information for filters, holders, kits, sets and accessories

Neutral Density Standard Filters

Neutral Density Standard Filters

ProGlass Neutral
Density Filters

Little Stopper
& Big Stopper

We offer ND filters with a full range of stopping power

The Big Stopper (10 stops) & Little Stopper (6 stops) are both very dense neutral density filters. Other ND filters are also available from 0.3 ND (1 stop) to 0.9 ND (3 stops).

Ultimate flexibility

ND Filters can be stacked together, or used with other filters, so you can respond to almost any lighting situation.

Specialist filters for digital

When shooting digitally, light at the infrared and ultraviolet ends of the spectrum can be problematic. The ProGlass range of filters has been designed with this in mind. These glass neutral density filters are optimised for use with digital cameras, as they absorb more infrared and ultraviolet light than traditional ND filters. The result is a punchier image, with less discolouration in adverse lighting conditions.

Before

Before LEE ND Standard

After – LEE 0.6 ND Standard

After LEE ND Standard

Seven5 ND Filter Sets

ND filter sets focused on either Out of Town, Seascape or Urban environments. Two appropriate ND Grads plus the Big Stopper.

100mm Hard ND Grad Set

0.3 ND Hard Grad (1 stop)

0.6 ND Hard Grad (2 stops)

0.9 ND Hard Grad (3 stops)

Inspiring Professionals

Reimagined for tablets these new eBooks take you through stunning landscape photos and the exact filters and techniques used.

The System

  • Adaptor Ring

    screws onto camera lens

  • Filter Holder

    attaches to the adaptor ring

  • LEE Filter

    slides into the filter holder

More info

LEE Filters Quick Start Videos

You can view all our videos with Closed Captions and Translations (beta) on our YouTube Channel LEEfiltersTV

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